How to freeze food with out using plastic!

Posted on January 6, 2016 by The Zero-Waste Chef

When I post pictures of my jar-filled freezer on social media, I get lots of questions about it, usually along the following lines:

Is it safe to freeze food in glass? (Yes)
Do you use special glass for the freezer? (No)
Don’t your glass containers break? (Only that one time…)

I have had little trouble freezing food in glass. I do however take a couple of precautions:

Always leave headspace when freezing liquids. I prefer wide-mouth jars for freezing or at least jars without shoulders (i.e., straight sides all the way up to the top). I have broken only one glass container in the freezer—it’s one of those things you do only once. I filled a narrow-neck milk bottle with liquid (likely broth, I forget exactly). Even though I had left head space, when the liquid froze, it expanded and snapped the narrow neck cleanly off the (very nice) bottle. Oops.

Occasionally I’ll use pyrex round or rectangular containers with plastic lids, which I bought before I went plastic-free. I don’t use these very often in the freezer because I like to keep the glass portion of them free for roasting food.

Don’t overstuff your freezer with jars stacked all over the place willy-nilly. When you open your freezer door, jars might fall out onto the floor and break.

19 Ways To Create Good Karma

by on  Apr 27, 2011

Via www.elephantjournal.com

As the blazing fire reduces wood to ashes, similarly, the fire of Self-knowledge reduces all Karma to ashes. ~ Bhagavad Gita

1. Hang this message near your night stand: It’s not just about what yoga gives to me, but what I give to the world! Give it to everyone!

2. For one whole day, forget about expectations. Greet everyone with compassion. Have no attachment to their reaction.

Compassion (from Latin: “co-suffering”) is a virtue —one in which the emotional capacities of empathy and sympathy (for the suffering of others) are regarded as a part of love itself, and a cornerstone of greater social interconnectedness and humanism—foundational to the highest principles in philosophy, society and personhood.

3. Wear everything in your closet. Give away everything you don’t (and don’t buy more). The rule is, if you haven’t worn it in the past year (okay, depending on the seasons), you’re not going to wear it this year. Don’t hold onto those jeans from when you were nineteen. It may not happen again in this lifetime—it doesn’t matter—you are never more perfect than you are right now.

4. Pick up litter in your neighborhood. It’s good exercise, it’s good for everyone and it’s contagious! Make it a point to pick up a piece everyday! Give homage to our dear Earth who has carried us everyday of our existence.

5. Do something creative with a youngling. Paint, draw, make sock puppets, role play (yep, I said it), read out loud or simply enjoy their company. Help them to control the force and wield a lightsaber!

6. Make someone an offer they can’t refuse. A foot rub, hand massage, lend an ear, a shoulder or give a great big bear hug for no good reason.

7. Pray. Pray for every single living creature on the planet. Do it now, do it every time you remember.

8. Don’t tell lies. For one entire day, or as long as you can do it, do not utter a single white lie.

9. Appreciate nature. Go for a walk in the park. Take your time. Sit on a bench. Enjoy the flow and movement of all that coexists. It’s magic. There’s more to it than we imagine

10. Spread the word. Memorize a profound quote, a mantra or poem. Share it with someone you love (this includes pets). And, don’t forget plants—give them some heart-felt attention, talk to them while you water.

11. Go vegan for 24-hours. Eat nothing that comes from an animal for one entire day (or the rest of your life!). Think of the suffering that animals go through before reaching our plates.

12. Give a special twinkle to everyone over 60. Of course acknowleding and smiling at everyone is the ideal way to go but, go on, make it a point to send some extra loving vibes and compassion to our local oldie but goodies.

13. Don’t start any fights. For an entire day, or as often as you can, surrender and lay down your sword. Treat every potentially volatile situation with complete compassion and patience and allow your inner voice of reason to be your guide. This includes thoughts when driving! No road rage!

14. Get out of bed in a good mood. Never again wake up on the wrong side of the bed. If you do, don’t take it seriously. Look in the mirror, smile and remind yourself that it’s great to be alive.

15. Get labeled a good-deed-doer. Be a service to others, volunteer locally, be good neighbors, be loving to your children’s friends and always allow your heart to be vast and spacious. There’s room for everyone and everything.

16. Don’t turn a blind eye. See someone in distress or that needs help, offer a compassionate hand.

17. Deal with your issues. Deal with your own sh*t and honor your mistakes. Own up to everything and don’t pass your crap on to your children, spouse, partner, colleagues or anyone you come into contact with. Stop the vicious cycle!

18. Don’t avoid anyone. Answer your phone. Answer your door. Make eye contact and hold your head up. No shields. Be open to others.

19. Believe in the process. The process of yoga, life, your creative expression, your individual interpretation, your strength, your magic and all the peace that resides within.

Beets -DID YOU KNOW (DYK) the health benefits? by Tori Avey | October 8, 2014

They are said to have grown  in the Hanging Gardens of Babylon. The Elizabethans enjoyed them in tarts and stews. Thomas Jefferson planted them at Monticello. Medieval cooks stuffed them into pies. The colorful, sweet root vegetable known as the beet tends to spark an impassioned response from folks who either love it or loathe it. In the anti-beet camp are President Obama of beets, while others can’t stand the thought of them.and his wife Michelle, who asked that they not be planted in the White House’s organic vegetable garden. Many complain that beets have an “earthy” taste, which isn’t far off the mark. Beets contain a substance called geosmin, which is responsible for that fresh soil scent in your garden following a spring rain. Humans are quite sensitive to geosmin, even in very low doses, which explains why our beet response ranges from one extreme to the other. Some people adore the  earthy flavor of beets, while others don’t.

Beets are most commonly a dark red color, however they also come in other hues ranging from white to yellow to a “candy cane” red-and-white variety known as Chioggia. Not only are they colorful and full of flavor, they are rich in antioxidants, folic acid, potassium, and fiber. They also contain unique antioxidants called betalains, which are currently being studied as a potential weapon in the fight against cancer. Betalains give beets their red hue. The rosy betalain-rich juice of red beets was used as a cheek and lip stain by women during the 19th century, a practice that inspired the old adage “red as a beet.”

Humans originally ate beet greens but not the thin and fibrous roots, which were occasionally used in medicine. The large beet leaves and stalks were consumed like chard, a close relative. Despite only growing well during spring and fall, beets were so well regarded in Ancient Rome and Greece that methods were developed for producing them during the hot summer months. The root part of the beet was cultivated for consumption in either Germany or Italy, first recorded in 1542. Its earliest form more closely resembled a parsnip rather than the bulbous shape we’re now familiar with, which began appearing near the end of the 1500s. This variety is thought to have evolved from a prehistoric North African root vegetable. Soon it became the most recognizable form of beet, but it wasn’t a worldwide culinary success until two centuries later. Northeastern Europe was the first area to embrace the beet root as a dietary staple; it was valued as one of the only vegetables that grew well throughout winter.

In 1747 Andreas Sigismund Marggraf, a chemist from Berlin, discovered a way to produce sucrose from beets. His student, Franz Achard, perfected this method for extracting sugar, leading him to predict the inevitable rise of beet beer, tobacco and molasses, among other products. Though not entirely convinced that beets had a bright future, the King of Prussia eventually subsidized a sugar beet industry. The first plant was built in what is now western Poland. It turned out to be a solid investment. Today, around 20 percent of the world’s sugar comes from sugar beets. Beet sugar production requires 4 times less water than sugar cane production, making it an attractive crop throughout Europe as well as in more arid countries like Egypt.

Beets have long been considered an aphrodisiac in many cultures. Ancient Romans believed that beets and their juice promoted amorous feelings. Frescoes of beets decorate the walls of the Lupanare brothel in Pompeii. In Greek mythology, Aphrodite, the goddess of love, ate beets to enhance her appeal. This quaint folklore actually has a basis in reality. Beets are a natural source of tryptophan and betaine, both substances that promote a feeling of well-being. They also contain high amounts of boron, a trace mineral which increases the level of sex hormones in the human body.

 

Trash Can Planters

Mobile Container Garden

 

Select Trash Cans

Select a combination of tall, medium and low metal trash bins. Keep in mind that groupings work best in odd numbers.

Add Drainage Holes

Use a drill and drill bit to add about 5 holes in the bottom of the trash can to allow for drainage.

Predrill Holes for Casters

Attach Casters

Measure proper spacing for casters with tape measure, then add mark with marker. Drill holes, then attach casters with bolts and screws. For reinforcement of extra large trash cans, attach a strip of pre-cut, pressure-treated lumber to bottom before attaching casters.

Attach Casters to Trash Can